Category Archives: press

Iain Sinclair on Nick Papadimitriou (and Richard Mabey)

Subject of The London Perambulator, Nick Papadimitriou, gets a good mention in Iain Sinclair’s excellent article about Richard Mabey’s The Unofficial Countryside in The Guardian. This description of Nick’s practice neatly encapsulates the theme of the film.

“The Unofficial Countryside was an exciting rediscovery for me: the unacknowledged pivot between the new nature writers and those others, of a grungier dispensation, who are randomly (and misleadingly) herded together as “psychogeographers”. Will Self, looking to JG Ballard, a large presence on the western collar of London, as mentor and inspiration, has recently undertaken a series of yomps between airports and cities: the ultimate shock-corridors of deregulated urbanism. A Liverpool clergyman, John Davies, took a sabbatical to hike down the acoustic footprints of the M62, from Hull to Crosby beach. But the most submerged inheritor of the genealogy set out by Mabey in 1973 – Cobbett, Defoe, the 17th-century mercenary John Taylor, John Hillaby – is the self-proclaimed “deep topographer” Nick Papadimitriou. A solid invisible, tramping and haunting Mabey’s familiar turf, the Colne valley: the canals, reservoirs and sewage farms of the Watford-to-Heathrow corridor.

When Papadimitriou, archivist and scavenger, a person who solicits arrest and confrontation every time he sets out to visit another decommissioned settlement, tries to make a record of the Bedford Court Estate, he carries one book as his totem. The estate is doomed, a parking lot for aircraft, but Papadimitriou, recording wild flowers, invading abandoned orchards, keeps faith with his chosen text. This is how he transcribes the episode in a contribution to the anthology London, City of Disappearances (2006): “I first stumbled across the Bedford Court Estate during an attempt to visit Perry Oaks, a sludge-disposal works set up by the County Council in the 1930s . . . The sewage works featured in that record of urban wildlife, Richard Mabey’s The Unofficial Countryside . . . Mabey drew attention to the rare waders using the works as a halt on their migratory flights.”

Read the rest of the article here

The London Perambulator will be screening at Curzon Soho on Wednesday 14th July followed by a Q&A with John Rogers and Nick Papadimitriou

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Interview

London Perambulator director John Rogers talking about film-making, walking, blogging and London on Lost Steps, Resonance 104.4fm

Download or listen here

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London’s Burning on Resonance fm

The podcast of London’s Burning on Resonance fm is now available with London Perambulator director John Rogers talking about the film, psychogeography and London with Malcolm Vache from Housman’s bookshop, artist Laura Oldfield Ford, and authors Ken Worpole and Merlin Coverley.
Download the podcast here

You can listen to Resonance on 104.4fm or online at http://resonancefm.com/listen
Details about the Housmans London’s Burning season of events including a screening of The London Perambulator can be found here

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Reviews from East End Film Festival screening

The Quietus 
“…as part of the East London Film Festival, a different pace is explored in the first screening of John Roger’s documentary The London Perambulator, a thoughtful and, at times, deeply moving piece about Nick Papadimitriou”. continue reading here

Stewart Home
“The London Perambulator struck me as a cross between Iain Sinclair and Chris Petit’s Channel 4 movies such as The Falconer and works by the artist Luke Fowler including Bogman Palmjaguar and The Way Out”. continue reading here

John Davies.org
“John Rogers’ film is an excellent study of the character and vision of a man who would be dubbed by the literary press or Sunday supplements (if they ever discovered him) as an English eccentric, but whose clarity of vision is such that it makes you think that it’s the rest of us who are eccentric, locked as we are into the banalities of capital, or what Guy Debord called The Spectacle, whereby we have lost contact with the ground we tread on, the land we inhabit; we don’t see where we’re going.” continue reading here

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